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All About Long Pepper | Know Your Spice Indian Long Pepper or Pipli (Piper longum)

All About Indian Long Pepper | Know Your Spice Pippali or Pipli (Piper longum)

All About Indian Long Pepper | Know Your Spice Pippali or Pipli (Piper longum)

All About Indian Long Pepper | Know Your Spice Pipli, Pippali or Thippili (Piper longum)

Indian Long Pepper (Piper longum) is also known as Pipli, Pippali, Pimpli.

Long pepper was freely used alongside (and often confused with) common black pepper in kitchens from ancient Rome to Renaissance Europe.

But the arrival of chillies from the New World and the rising popularity of black pepper shoved long pepper out of the culinary spotlight.

Indian Long Pepper is known for its curious looking spikes & is known to help in stimulating the appetite.

What are the other names of Indian Long Pepper?

Pipli names in other languages are given below.
Indian Languages Other Languages
Hindi: Pipli, Pippali
Telugu: Pipli
Punjabi: Maghaun
Marathi: Pimpli
Kannada: Hippali
Malayalam: Thippali
Tamil: Tippili
Urdu: Pipul
Latin (Botanical): Piper longum
Arabic: Darfilfil
Chinese: Pipo
English: Indian Long Pepper
French: Poivre long

German: Langer Pfeffer
Greek: Peperi Makron
Spanish: Pimentara Larga

What exactly is Long Pepper?

Get to know about Thippili or Pipli

Spice card – all about indian long pepper | know your spice pippali or pipli (piper longum)

Botanically, the long pepper (Piper longum), sometimes called Indian long pepper or pipli, is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae.

The plant stems are flexuous, pubescent and terete. The leaves are simple. The petiole is grooved, of variable length and can reach 10 cm long.

The blade is ovate, 6 –12 cm × 3 –12 cm, papery, the base cordate and asymmetrical, the apex acuminate and with two or three pairs of secondary nerves arising from the base.

The inflorescence is a cylindrical and slightly curved spike which is 1.5 –5 cm long and opposite the leaves. The fruits are drupaceous, globose and 0.2 cm in diameter

There are actually two commercially grown species of long pepper: Piper longum, and the cheaper and wider-spread Piper retrofractum, from Indonesia (the island of Java, specifically).

Their flavours are similar enough to be interchangeable, but they’re worth mentioning for inspiration about cuisines the spice takes well to.

What are the medicinal properties of long pepper?

Below are the medicinal properties of Thippili or Pippali as per Ayurveda

Piper longum medicinal Properties
Rasa (taste)
– Katu (pungent)
Guna (property) – Laghu (lite), Teekshna (strong, piercing)
Vipaka (post-digestion effect) – Madhura – Undergoes sweet taste conversion after digestion
Veerya (Potency) – Ushna – Hot potency
Effect on Tridosha – Balances Vata and Kapha Doshas. (wet variety increases Kapha Dosha).

What is the nutritional value of long pepper?

Find out about the nutritional value of Pipli or Thippili

Recent work on its fruit has shown the presence of the alkaloids, piperine (4 to 5%) and piplartine (25%), and two new alkaloids, one of which is designated as alkaloid A.

This is closely related to pellitorine producing marked salivation, numbness and a tingling sensation of mucous membranes of the mouth.

A sample of dried fruit of long pepper on steam distillation gave 0.7% of an essential oil with spicy odor resembling that of pepper and ginger oils.

What is the chemical composition of long pepper?

Know and understand about chemical composition of Thippili or Pipli

Studies were carried out on the chemical composition of long pepper and the results showed that long pepper contained about 1% volatile oil, 1.25% piperine and 40% starch.

Analysis of the essential oil showed the presence of 48 components, out of which 44 were identified for the first time.

The three major components of the oil identified were beta-caryophyllene (17%), pentadecane (17.8%) and beta-bisabolene (11.16%).

    What is the history of long pepper?

    Know more about the origins & the story behind Thippili or Indian Long Pepper

    The oldest known reference to pippali comes from ancient Indian textbooks of Ayurveda, where its medicinal and dietary uses are described in detail.

    Pippali pepper was first mentioned in Charaka Samhita (IV–II B.C.) – the ancient Indian guide to a healthy and balanced way of living.

    It reached Greece in the sixth or fifth century BCE, though Hippocrates discussed it as a medicament rather than a spice.

    Among the Greeks and Romans and prior to the European rediscovery of the American Continents, long pepper was an important and well-known spice.

    The ancient history of black pepper is often interlinked with (and confused with) that of pipli, though Theophrastus distinguished the two in the first work of botany.

    The Romans knew of both and often referred to either as just piper; Pliny erroneously believed dried black pepper and Indian long pepper came from the same plant.

    It is also said that Attila the Hun demanded part of the ransom for his sacking of Rome to be paid in long peppers.

    Round, or black pepper, began to compete with long pepper in Europe from the twelfth century and had displaced it by the fourteenth.

    The quest for cheaper and more dependable sources of black pepper fueled the Age of Discoveries.

    After the discovery of the American continents & of chili pepper, called by the Spanish pimiento, employing their word for long pepper, did the popularity of long pepper fade away.

    The word pepper itself is derived from the word for long pepper, pippali.

    The plant itself, is a native of India. The word pepper in bell pepper, referring to completely different plants (in the Capsicum family), is of the same etymology.

    What are the uses of Long Pepper?

    How is Indian long pepper or Pipli or Thippili used?
      • It is used as spice and also in pickles and preserves.
      • Since it has a pungent pepper like taste and, the root is used to ferment rice beer.
      • In Andaman and Nicobar Islands, the leaves are chewed like betel leaves.
      • It is used in the treatment of respiratory disorders and also as an important constituent in digestive formulations.
      • The roots and thicker parts of the stem are cut and dried and used as an important drug (Piplamool or Pippali) in the Ayurvedic and Unani systems.
      • In some hilly parts of Visakhapatnam in Andhra Pradesh, it is grown for its roots.
      • Overall, it is used for preparation of exquisite culinary dishes as well as for the treatment and prophylaxis of various diseases, and also in the cosmetics industry.

    What does Long Pepper taste like?

    What is the the taste of Thippili or Pippali?

    Long Pepper flavour is much more complex than black pepper, reminiscent of spice blends like garam masala.

    It possesses black pepper’s heat and musk, but in a less harsh, more nuanced way, tempered by sweet notes of nutmeg, cinnamon, and cardamom.

    Its finish lingers on the tongue with a tobacco-like coolness; where black pepper stings, long pepper balms.


    Health benefits of indian long pepper, pippali or pipli (piper longum)


    What can I use Long Pepper for?

    Learn how to use Pipli in your food & beverages.
    • Whole, dried long pepper spikes can be used in marinades, stews and roasts.
    • Put them in vegetable pickles (fresh or dried).
    • Use them in soups the same way you might use a bay leaf.
    • You can also steep them in tea with honey.
    • Puree pipli for inclusion in curries, sauces, dips and dressings.
    • Apply pippali liberally to burgers, steaks, burritos, vegetables, curries, salads, etc.
    • Use it to make a herbal soup called ‘kandathippili rasam’.
    • Grind to a powder and add it to coleslaw, fresh fruit.
    • Add it to your berbere recipe mix.
    • Fry it with some purified butter (the so–called ghee butter) for the treatment of cough.
    • You can also consume pippali powder with some honey and get a respite from cough.

    How long does Long Pepper last?

    Learn about how long does Long Pepper last in storage.

    Stored whole, pippali may last for 3 – 4 years. Stored ground it will last for upto two years but it may lose some of its potency over time.

    How do I store Long Pepper?

    Learn about how to store long pepper.

    Store pipli in a dry & airtight glass container in a place where it’s away from heat, moisture, and direct sunlight.

    Is there a substitute for Long Pepper?

    Learn how to use a substitute for pippali if unavailable

    You can use white pepper with a bit of ground nutmeg, mace or cardamom.

    The pine and citrus notes that come from tellicherry pepper make it a great substitute for long pepper in terms of flavor.

    The grains of paradise spice is also known as alligator pepper has several similarities to Indian long pepper.

    Where do I buy Long Pepper from?

    Where to Locate Long Pepper in the Grocery Store?

    Pippali are available in whole, crushed or powdered form. You can buy pippali (Long Pepper) or dried lemon (lemon omani) at most Indian groceries or online at Amazon

    What are the health benefits of Long Pepper?

    Learn about health benefits of Indian Long Pepper or Piper longum

    Health Benefits of Indian Long Pepper, Pipli, Pippali, Thippili

    Pippali has been shown to help fight diseases such as inflammation, depression and diabetes, among others, so it’s a great reason to add Pipli to your repertoire right now.

    • Pipli is also used to make powerful Rasayana in Ayurveda and helps in detoxification. It is also very useful in colds and cough.
    • Health Benefits of Pipli for Obesity – Pippali is administered along with honey to treat obesity, Kapha imbalance disorders like cold, cough, asthma, fever.
    • Health Benefits of Pipli for Asthma, Anemia – Pipli powder one part and jaggery or honey two parts is mixed and administered to relieve cough, asthma, anemia, cardiac disorders, anemia and intestinal worm infestation.
    • Health Benefits of Pippali against Tuberculosis: It is very useful to improve lung strength, because it is rejuvenative and anti-aging.
    • Health Benefits of Indian Long pepper for Digestion – It improves appetite, it helps to avoid weight loss associated with tuberculosis and its treatment.
    • Health Benefits of Pipli in Diabetes – It helps in regulating the amount of sugar in the blood, making the condition far more manageable and harmless.
    • Health Benefits of Pippali for Liver Ailments – It has components that are known to protect the liver. It can make sure that the liver toxicity is always managed, and it also prevents jaundice from occurring.
    • Health Benefits of Pipli as an Antibacterial Agent – It has strong antibacterial qualities. As bacteria are something that is always present around you, not much can be done in order to prevent your body’s exposure to the same. However, you can certainly prevent bacterial infections from occurring.
    • Health Benefits of Pipli for Weight Loss – Indian long pepper helps with weight loss management. It basically reduces the fat in the body and also gets rid of fatty toxins, which helps you lose the additional weight.
    • Health Benefits of Pipli for Menstrual Problems – It can help curb heavy menstrual flow and can also help with menstrual cramps. It even combats fatigue and some of the symptoms of PMS.
    • Health Benefits of Pippali as an Aphrodisiac – Pipli also has the properties of an aphrodisiac. It can calm you down and relax your body. It promotes longevity and can also be used as a viable remedy for erectile dysfunction. Health
    • Benefits of Indian Pipli for Respiration – Pippali can be used to speed up the recovery from a cough or cold and also reduces fever. It can also help people with bronchitis and asthma.

    Print

    Long Pepper or Indian Long Pepper Powder | Make Pipli Powder at Home (Piper longum)

    Long Pepper or Indian Long Pepper Powder | Make Pipli Powder at Home (Piper longum) - This is an easiest way to incorporate long pepper in your diets as an alternative to pepper powder.
    Course Condiment
    Cuisine Indian
    Diet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Vegan, Vegetarian
    Keyword Indian Long Pepper, Indian Long Pepper Powder, Long Pepper, Long Pepper Powder, Pimpli, Pipli, Pippali
    Prep Time 3 minutes
    Cook Time 7 minutes
    Total Time 10 minutes
    Servings 18 Servings
    Calories 10kcal
    Author Sumit Malhotra

    Ingredients

    • 100 gram Cup Indian Long Pepper
    • 3 minutes Heat

    Instructions

    • Toss & roast the long pepper in a frying pan.
    • When fragrant, place them in the base of pestle and mortar.
    • Bash the long pepper in an up-and-down motion for 10 seconds. This should be enough for the pepper to split.
    • Now rest the pestle inside the mortar, and move your wrist in a circular motion.
    • After another 10 seconds, the pepper should be ground into a fine powder.

    Notes

    Tools & Equipment Used For This Recipe

    The links below the image lead to product links on Amazon.in & Amazon.com respectively

    FInally! To Sum It Up

    All About Long Pepper (Piper longum) | Benefits of Long Pepper

    Pipli was freely used alongside (and often confused with) common black pepper in kitchens from ancient Rome to Renaissance Europe.

    But the arrival of chillies from the New World and the rising popularity of black pepper shoved pippali out of the culinary spotlight.

    Indian Long Pepper is known for its curious looking spikes & is known to help in stimulating the appetite.

    Long Pepper flavour is much more complex than black pepper, reminiscent of spice blends like garam masala.

    It possesses black pepper’s heat and musk, but in a less harsh, more nuanced way, tempered by sweet notes of nutmeg, cinnamon, and cardamom.

    Its finish lingers on the tongue with a tobacco-like coolness; where black pepper stings, long pepper balms.

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