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All About Angelica | Know Your Spice Dudhachoraa (Angelica archangelica)

All About Angelica aka Dudhachoraa, Choraka bheda (Angelica archangelica)

All About Angelica aka Dudhachoraa, Choraka bheda (Angelica archangelica)

All About Angelica | Know Your Spice Choraka bheda or Dudhachoraa (Angelica archangelica)

Angelica is also known as Dudhachoraa, Choraka bheda, Wild Celery, or Masterwort (Angelica archangelica)

All About Angelica | Angelica is also known as Dudhachoraa, Choraka bheda (Angelica archangelica)

Choraka bheda is a tall perennial herb with thick hollow stem bearing large bipinnate leaves and umbels of greenish-white flowers.

It is native to Syria but is known to occur in many parts of Europe and Western Asia.

In India, it is found wild in inner valleys of Himalayas viz. Kashmir, Chamba, Kullu, Pangi, Lahaul and Kinnaur at altitudes between 3200 and 4200 m.

It is believed Choraka bheda originated in northern Europe and was not used until the fifteenth century.

Angelica roots form a vital part of the history of aromatherapy for fighting against mental exhaustion, anxiety and stress. They are also used to flavour liqueurs and in perfumery.

What are the other names of Angelica?

Angelica names in other languages are given below.

Angelica is lovingly called as the ‘Oil of Angels’ and ‘Root of the Holy Spirit’.

Indian Languages
Other Languages
Bengali:
Punjabi: –
Tamil:
Telugu: –
Hindi – Choraka bheda
Latin: Angelica archangelica
English: Wild Celery, Norwegian Angelica, Masterwort
German: Arznei-engelwurz
Farsi: Gol-par
Dutch: Grote-engelwortel

What exactly is Angelica?

Get to know about Angelica

Spice card – all about angelica aka dudhachoraa (angelica archangelica)

Choraka bheda is a variety of herb that belongs to a family of plants known as Apiaceae or Carrot Family.

Its scientific name is Angelica archangelica.

It is a tall perennial herb with a thick hollow stem, bearing large bipinnate leaves, and umbels of greenish-white flowers.

Dudhachoraa thrives in shade, moist open areas, yet it can withstand adverse environment wonderfully well, and even endure severe winter frost without harm.

Masterwort has both a part that could be considered a vegetable (the large stem), and parts that resemble and can be used herbs (root, seeds, leaves).

What is the botanical description of Angelica?

Botanical information of Angelica

Botanics – Considered a biennial or short-lived perennial, Masterwort or Wild Celery is a member of the Apiaceae or carrot family.

Angelica archangelica is a genus of about 60 species of tall biennial and perennial herbs in the family Apiaceae.

It is native to temperate and subarctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

The family Apiaceae includes anise, celery, cumin, fennel, dill and other plants characterized by feathery leaves, fluted stems and clusters of flowers that emerge from globular umbels.

Angelica is an impressive looking plant. It can reach an ultimate height of 6 feet or higher with a 2 foot width. It has fragrant greenery at ground level with indented leaves.

Its hollow leafstalks resemble those of celery, they branch out and support the umbels (heads of small flowers which are followed by aromatic seeds).

All parts of Choraka bheda are used, roots, seeds stems and leaves.

What is the nutrition value of Angelica?

Know the nutritional value of Angelica or Masterwort

Dudhachoraa, from the plant Angelica archangelica, is similar to the Chinese herb Dong Quai, which is derived from the closely related plant Angelica sinensis.

Compounds to be found in A.archangelica are bittering agents, essential oils, flavonoids, tanning agents, resins, silica, carbohydrates, coumarins, organic acids and terpenes.

Essential oils derived from dudhachoraa root are composed of over 60 different constituents.

β−phellandrene and α−pinene have the highest concentration in root oil but sabiene, myrcene, limonene, 3−carene and p−cymene are also found in large amounts.

What is the chemical composition of Angelica?

Know and understand about chemical composition of Masterwort.

Chemical composition of Angelica was found to contain:

  • limonene, S-phellandrene, pinene, p-cymene, terpinolene, myrcene, fenchone, linalool,
  • S-terpineol, cadinene, borneol, S-caryophyllene, bisabolol, angelica lactone,
  • Other mono and sesquiterpenes. Other constituents include selimone, archangelin, oxypeucedanin.

    What is the history of Angelica?

    Know more about the origins & the story behind Angelica or Masterwort or Wild Celery

    The term angélica is Middle Latin and was derived from the Greek aggelikós and ággelos  meaning ’messenger’ or ’angel’.

    Legend has it that an angel (Archangel Michael) showed mankind the healing plant.

    Archangélica comes from the Greek word archággalos meaning ‘archangelic’, which is the superlative of angelica, and strongly emphasises the particular medicinal value of the plant.

    From the 10th century on, angelica was cultivated as a vegetable and medicinal plant, and achieved popularity in Scandinavia in the 12th century and is used especially in Sami culture.

    The first reference to Angelica was in the 14th century by Matthaeus Sylvaticus.

    In 1588, Tabernaemontanus wrote of “Angelica with its extraordinary power and virtue, as if the Holy Ghost or the dear angels had revealed this plant and wholesome root to mankind.”

    The history of angelica includes its use as a cure for the plague. It was used as a plague curative until the time of Charles II (Charles Stuart, 1630-1685).

    What are the uses of Angelica?

    How is the Angelica plant used?
    • Angelica oil used to flavour liqueurs and in perfumery.
    • Its tender shoots are used in making certain kinds of aromatic sweetmeats;
    • Tea made from the roots and leaves is a traditional medicine for respiratory ailments.
    • In the Faroe Islands and in Iceland, where the plant grows abundantly, it is considered a vegetable.
    • Dudhachoraa is used in the treatment of digestive disorders and problems with blood circulation.
    • Choraka bheda is a good remedy for colds, coughs, pleurisy, wind, colic, rheumatism and diseases of the urinary organs, though it should not be given to patients who have a tendency towards diabetes.
    • The dried leaves, on account of their aromatic qualities, are used in the preparation of hop bitters.
    • The stem is largely used in the preparation of preserved fruits and as an aromatic garnish by confectioners.
    • The celery like leafstalks can also be cooked or eaten raw, and essential oils distilled from the seeds and roots are used in perfumes.
    • Angelica oils are used as a flavoring for food as well as beverages like gin, vermouth, and various liqueurs & aquavits such as Absinthe, Chartreuse, Dubonnet, Bénédictine and Bitter Schnapps.
    • The Sámi of Norway, Finland and Russia, also referred to as Laplanders, added the fresh or dried root to snuff.

    What does Angelica taste like?

    What is the the taste of Angelica?

    Angelica has an earthy flavour. It’s a little bitter and a little herbal, and is reminiscent of wormwood. The herbal tones carry through to the nose, with a faintly nettle-like smell.

    The flavour of angelica can sometimes be mistaken for that of juniper berries – though the two are quite different.

    So, the flavour of angelica is one of a kind. It is earthy, slightly sweet, a little bit bitter, and may present a hint of licorice flavor.


    Candied angelica


    What can I use Angelica for?

    Learn how to use Angelica or Masterwort or Wild Celery in your food & beverages.
    • As a tea, as a remedy for indigestion,
    • candied as a cake topping decoration, in fruit salad, in ice cream.
    • It goes particularly well with sharply flavoured rhubarb.
    • The aromatic, naturally sweetish stems have been candied for tasty treats and used in pastry decorations.
    • They are also used to sweeten tart fruits and to make jam.
    • Use the essential oil as a food flavouring.
    • Cooking angelica is similar to the way you would prepare asparagus or celery.
    • Fresh stalks and leaves can be eaten raw in fruit salads, or used as a garnish.
    • Stalks can be stewed and made into pie fillings or jams, roasted with meat, or sauteed in butter to be served as a side dish.
    • The leaves can be used to add flavor to poultry, fish, soup, fruit pies, or stews.
    • You can also use the leaves to make a compound butter for use in cooking.
    • The seeds can be used as a spice, with a flavor similar to fennel or anise.

    How long does Angelica last?

    Learn about how long does angelica last in storage.

    Fresh angelica wrapped in damp kitchen paper, placed in a perforated bag and stored in the fridge lasts for up to three days.

    How do I store Angelica?

    Learn about how to store Angelica or Masterwort or Wild Celery.

    Fresh angelica should be wrapped in damp kitchen paper, placed in a perforated bag and stored in the fridge. It will last for up to three days.

    Keep candied or dried angelica in a sealed container in the cupboard for around 4 months.

    Is there a substitute for Angelica?

    Learn how to use a substitute for Masterwort or Wild Celery or Angelica if unavailable

    If a recipe calls for Angelica leaves and you don’t have any try using celery or lovage leaves in equal amount as a substitute.

    Where do I buy Angelica from?

    Where to Locate Angelica in the Grocery Store?

    What are the health benefits of Angelica?

    Learn about health benefits of Angelica or Angelica archangelica

    Health Benefits of Angelica (Angelica archangelica) or Benefits of Angelica

    • Health Benefits of Angelica Nutritionally – It’s thought that most of the potential benefits of A. sinensis come from ligustilide, a powerful compound that comprises approximately 1% of the plant and provides much of its strong fragrance
    • Health Benefits of Angelica for Respiratory Problems – Angelica root is used in the powdered form for internal usage in Ayurveda and is also recommended as an oil for topical application and is also suggested as an inhalation for respiratory problems.
    • Health Benefits of Angelica for ImmunityPrimordial medicinal practices recommended the chewing of Angelica leaves or drinking the tea prepared with these leaves, for enhancing the immunity of a person.
    • Health Benefits of Angelica for Digestive Problems – Angelica is an excellent remedy for treating digestive problems like colic, intestinal gas and indigestion. Many physicians prescribe it for curing anorexia as it is known to stimulate the digestive as well as the nervous system.
    • Health Benefits of Angelica as a Blood Cleanser The essential oil of Angelica has diuretic property, which improves the quantity and frequency of urination, through which the accumulated water remains, toxic substances, salt, uric acid and fat in the blood and the body gets eliminated.
    • Health Benefits of Angelica for Menstrual Problems – Angelica essential oil has excellent emmenagogue properties that help in treating the premenstrual syndrome, delayed menstruation, blocked periods, menopausal problems and polycystic ovarian syndrome.
    • Health Benefits of Angelica for Cancer –Angelica oil is also claimed as a trusted natural remedy for treating cancerous growths, bleeding problems, constipation, psoriasis, dry skin problems, liver infections, diarrhea, sore throat, typhus fever and certain other health conditions.

    All About Angelica aka Dudhachoraa, Choraka bheda (Angelica archangelica)
    Print

    Angelica | Angelica Tea Recipe | Angelica Root Tea Recipe

    Angelica | Angelica Tea Recipe | Angelica Root Tea Recipe - Angelica contains substances that have antibactericidal, antiviral and antifungal properties and also compounds that seem to stimulate the immune system. 
    Course Beverage
    Cuisine World
    Diet Vegan, Vegetarian
    Keyword Angelica, Angelica Root Tea, Angelica Root Tea Recipe, Angelica Tea, Angelica Tea Recipe, Make Angelica Tea
    Cook Time 10 minutes
    Total Time 10 minutes
    Servings 1 Serving
    Calories 35kcal
    Author Sumit Malhotra

    Ingredients

    • 1 Teaspoon Angelica Tea Leaves
    • 1 Cup Boiling Water

    Instructions

    • Get your ingredients ready.
    • Boil water.
    • Add it to to one teaspoon of dried angelica tea leaves.
    • Steep covered for at least 10 minutes.
    • Optional: Add 0.5 teaspoon of honey.

    Notes

    • Add honey as a sweetener to your angelica tea if you like it sweeter.

    Tools & Equipment Used For This Recipe

    The links below the image lead to product links on Amazon.in & Amazon.com respectively

    FInally! To Sum It Up

    All About Angelica (Angelica archangelica) | Benefits of Angelica

    Spice card – all about angelica aka dudhachoraa (angelica archangelica)

    All About Angelica | Angelica is also spelt as Dudhachoraa, Angelica, Angelica, or Summac (Angelica archangelica)

    In India, it is found wild in inner valleys of Himalayas viz. Kashmir, Chamba, Kullu, Pangi, Lahaul and Kinnaur at altitudes between 3200 and 4200 m.

    It is believed Choraka bheda originated in northern Europe and was not used until the fifteenth century.

    Angelica roots form a vital part of the history of aromatherapy for fighting against mental exhaustion, anxiety and stress. They are also used to flavour liqueurs and in perfumery.

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