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All About Lovage | Know Your Spice Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

All About Lovage | Know Your Spice Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

All About Lovage | Know Your Spice Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

All About Lovage | Know Your Spice Maggiplant or Maggikraut (Levisticum officinale)

It is also known as love parsley, sea parsley, lavose, liveche, smallage, European lovage

Lovage is a hardy perennial with a height of 90 cm, flowers in summer, dying down in autumn. It bears clusters of yellow flowers with a sharp smell.

The roots are dug out in second or third year of planting and cut into slices in 13 mm thick and carefully dried. It has been long cultivated in Europe & tastes and looks a lot like celery.

It is used as an herb, the roots as a vegetable, and the seeds as a spice, especially in southern European cuisine.

What are the other names of Lovage?

Levisticum officinale names in other languages are given below.
Indian Languages Other Languages
Hindi:
Bengali:
Gujarati: –

Malayalam
: –
Marathi:
Punjabi:

Sanskrit:

Tamil:

Telugu:

Latin (Botanical): Levisticum officinale
Arabic: –
Chinese:
Yuhn yihp dong gwai
Dutch:
Lavas, Maggiplant
French: 
Céleri perpétuel
German: Badekraut, Maggikraut
Italian: Levistico, Sedano di Monte
Spanish: Ligústico
Swedish
: Libsticka

What exactly is Lovage?

Get to know more about Maggiplant or Maggikraut

Spice card – all about lovage | know your spice lovage. Jpg

Also known as Love Parsley (Levisticum officinale), the plant is a member of the Apiaceae (Carrot family).

It is an erect, herbaceous, perennial plant growing to 1.8–2.5 m (5.9–8.2 ft) tall, with a basal rosette of leaves and stems with further leaves

The exact native range of the herb is disputed; some sources cite it as native to much of Europe and southwestern Asia.

Others from only the eastern Mediterranean region in southeastern Europe and southwestern Asia, and yet others only to southwestern Asia in Iran and Afghanistan, citing European populations as naturalised.

Its flavour and smell can be described as a mix of celery and parsley, but with a higher intensity of both of those flavours. The name lovage is derived from “love-ache”.

Levisticum officinale has been grown over the centuries for its aromatic fragrance, it’s fine ornamental qualities and, to a lesser extent, its medicinal values.

The parts used for culinary purposes are the leaves used as an herb, the roots as a vegetable, and the seeds as a spice, especially in southern European cuisine.

What is the nutritional value of Lovage?

Find out about the nutritional value of Maggiplant or Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Levisticum officinale is high in many nutrients and minerals. It has loads of Vitamin C and B complex and is pretty low in calories.

The plant also has Quercetin, which inhibits histamine and helps with allergy symptoms. Many women also find relief from menstrual symptoms with lovage supplements.

What is the chemical composition of Lovage?

Know and understand about chemical composition of Maggikraut (Levisticum officinale)

Chemical constituents of its oil are mainly phthalides and terpenoids, including n-butylidene phthalide, n-butylphthalide, sedanonic anhydride, D-terpineol, carvacrol, eugenol and volatile oil.

The principal components of volatile oil are angelic acid and β-terpineol, coumarins, furocoumarins including psoralens, rotoside, sitosterols.

It also contains resins, pinene, phellandrene, terpinene, carvacrol, terpineol, isovaleric acid, umbelliferone and bergapten.

Fresh leaves contain a maximum 0.5% oil; the most important aroma components are phthalides (ligustilide, butylphthalide and a partially hydrogenated derivative thereof called sedanolide).

What is the history of Lovage?

Know more about the origins & the story behind Maggiplant or Maggikraut (Levisticum officinale)

Lovage (Levisticum officinale) has roots tracing centuries back through time. It is also known as “sea parsley” and “love parsley” — since its seeds were used in a medieval love ­potion.

Ancient monastery gardens also sported this versatile herb.

In the Middle Ages, Charlemagne, the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, so esteemed this herb that he decreed that it be grown in all his gardens.

The ancient Greeks and Romans were fans of the plant. The herb is mentioned in the works of Pliny, Galen, Dioscorides and Apicius.

In the twelfth century St. Hildegarde recommended Maggikraut for the relief of coughs, abdominal pains and heart problems.

The traditional School of Salerno used it as an herbal remedy for jaundice and liver complaints.

It was introduced into Britain by the Romans and brought to the USA by early English colonists.

Colonial women “cured” many ailments with lovage: sore eyes, upset stomach.

They used fresh leaves for summer “sallets” and flavored winter soups, with the dried root. The dried leaves seasoned the stuffing for roast goose or turkey.

Chewing the leaves was said to sweeten the breath, and the seeds were crushed and taken for improving digestion. American colonists also chewed the roots to stay alert.

What are the uses of Lovage?

How is Maggiplant or Maggikraut used?
  • It is used as a vegetable, herb and spice in South European cuisine.
  • Due to its strong perfume, it is used as a fragrance in manufacturing cosmetics and soaps.
  • Its seeds, leaves and root are most often used in traditional systems of medicine.
  • Its seeds are used as a flavouring in confectionery and liqueurs.
  • A tincture of the leaves is made to clear up skin rashes and spots, and it was placed in baths for fragrance and cleansing.

What does Lovage taste like?

What is the the taste of lovage?

The herb has an intriguing flavor, somewhere between those of parsley and celery. It tastes like celery, with softer undertones of parsley and hint of anise.


What can I use Lovage for?

Learn how to use Maggiplant or Maggikraut in your food & beverages.
  • Use it to flavour your soups, stews and stocks or pork and poultry dishes.
  • Use it to enhance the flavour of potato dishes.
  • Toss its lively young leaves in salads.
  • Shred it fine and add it to your scrambled eggs.
  • Use the seeds in biscuits and bread.
  • Use it for your pizza toppings.
  • Add a handful of chopped lovage on your pasta.
  • Blanch the stems and eat them like celery.
  • The stems can be candied like angelica or used as a vegetable
  • Use crushed lovage seeds as you would celery powder to season bread, soups, roasts, and cheese dishes.
  • Seeds whole or ground can be used in pickling brines, cheese spreads, salads, salad dressing, and sauces. Use whole dry seeds in baking.
  • You can cook lovage roots as a side dish.
  • The seeds are also used as a seasoning, much like celery seeds.
  • Dried lovage root is used to make teas, infusions and tinctures.

How long does Lovage last?

Learn about how long does Maggiplant or Maggikraut last in storage.

Lovage loses its flavour when dried. If fresh leaves are stored in a refrigerator, you can consume them within 15 days.

It is recommended that you briefly blanch the leaves and stems and then freeze them. Frozen leaves can last up to six months.

How do I store Lovage?

Learn about how to store Maggiplant or Maggikraut.
  • Store freshly harvested leaves and stems in a plastic bag in the crisper cabinet.
  • To freeze, simply blanch the leaves before freezing in ice cubes or oil.
  • Store the leaves and stems in an airtight opaque container; else the light will quickly yellow leaves and stems.

Is there a substitute for Lovage?

Learn how to use a substitute for Maggiplant or Maggikraut if unavailable

If you don’t have the herb handy, you can use equal amounts of fresh Celery leaves. Alternately, you can substitute (for 1 cup chopped lovage) 1 cup chopped of fresh celery.

Flat leaf parsley belongs to the same family as both lovage and celery. It has some of the same flavour notes.

Maggi stock cubes are another way that you can replicate the flavour. The similarity in their flavours is really why it is also called maggiplant & maggikraut.

Where do I buy lovage from?

Where to Locate Maggiplant or Maggikraut in the Grocery Store?

You may have a difficult time finding it in your local grocery store. However, herb farm places in your area should have the herb.

You can also grow your own in the spring and summer and seeds can be found in most well-stocked plant nurseries.

Online via Amazon – Lovage Oil | Lovage Herb Seeds

What are the health benefits of Lovage?

Learn about health benefits of Maggiplant or Maggikraut (Levisticum officinale)

The following are health benefits of lovage, maggiplant or maggikraut

  • Health Benefits of Lovage as an Anti Allergenic – Many of the health benefits of lovage relate to its anti-inflammatory and soothing nature, and the same is true for soothing the effects of allergens.
  • Health Benefits of Maggiplant for Skincare – When the maggiplant leaves are applied directly to the skin, or a salve is made, it can be very effective for reducing the symptoms of psoriasis and acne, leading to smoother, better-looking skin.
  • Health Benefits of Lovage as an Antioxidant – The antioxidants found in lovage can also help to prevent wrinkles in some cases and increase blood flow to the surface of the skin, improving tone and appearance.
  • Health Benefits of Maggiplant as an Antibacterial & Antifungal Agent – Studies have shown that lovage has a significant effect on various microbes and foreign agents that can cause illness within the body.
  • Health Benefits of Lovage for KidneysAdministration of Lovage containing product is effective to prevent kidney stone formation and associated renal cell damage.
  • Health Benefits of Maggiplant for Breathing – Lovage has an excellent expectorant quality which helps excrete out excess phlegm and accumulated mucus from the respiratory tract.
  • Health Benefits of Lovage for Digestion – Lovage has carminative property and reduces bloating symptoms by excreting excess gas. It smoothen the stomach and neutralizes the gastro-intestinal pH.
  • Health Benefits of Maggiplant for Mensuration – Menstrual cycle associated bloating and cramps also minimized with Lovage treatment. The nutritional components of Lovage help to maintain the energy level during the period of menstruation.
  • Health Benefits of Lovage for Anxiety – Lovage has acted on the GABA receptor and exerts a psychologically calming effect. Thus it acts as an anxiolytic and relief psychological stress.
  • Health Benefits of Maggiplant for Insomnia – Lovage may be useful for treating insomnia. A review of the literature analyzing patterns of herbal use for insomnia in China found positive outcomes with lovage.
  • Health Benefits of Lovage for Bone Health – The potent anti-inflammatory property of Lovage helps to treat arthritis, gout and other joint inflammatory conditions. It not only reduce the joint inflammation but also reduce pain symptoms.

All About Lovage | Know Your Spice Lovage (Levisticum officinale)
Print

Lovage - Lovage Tea | How to Make Lovage Tea?

Lovage tea has been known for its diuretic, antiseptic and antimicrobial properties. 
Course Beverage, Tea
Cuisine World
Diet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Vegan, Vegetarian
Keyword Lovage, Lovage Tea, Make Lovage Tea
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 1 Serving
Calories 3kcal
Author Sumit Malhotra

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons Lovage herb
  • I Cup Water Boiling

Instructions

  • Infuse about 2 teaspoons of dried lovage herb in a cup of boiling water.
  • Let the mix steep for about 5 to 7 minutes.
  • Serve hot or iced.

Notes

Lovage Tea is an aromatic, vigorous and stimulating beverage. You can serve it hot or iced. Lovage rhizome and roots - contain therapeutic properties. 
Lovage Tea is the simplest way to extract its benefits.

Tools & Equipment Used For This Recipe

The links below the image lead to product links on Amazon.in & Amazon.com respectively

Saucepan

Strainer

FInally! To Sum It Up

All About Lovage (Levisticum officinale) | Uses & Health Benefits of Lovage

Spice card – all about lovage | know your spice lovage. Jpg

Lovage (Levisticum officinale) plant is a member of the Apiaceae (Carrot family).

It is an erect, herbaceous, perennial plant growing to 1.8–2.5 m (5.9–8.2 ft) tall, with a basal rosette of leaves and stems with further leaves

The exact native range of the herb is disputed; some sources cite it as native to much of Europe and southwestern Asia.

Others from only the eastern Mediterranean region in southeastern Europe and southwestern Asia, and yet others only to southwestern Asia in Iran and Afghanistan, citing European populations as naturalised.

Its flavour and smell can be described as a mix of celery and parsley, but with a higher intensity of both of those flavours. The name lovage is derived from “love-ache”.

It has been grown over the centuries for its aromatic fragrance, it’s fine ornamental qualities and, to a lesser extent, its medicinal values.

The parts used for culinary purposes are the leaves used as an herb, the roots as a vegetable, and the seeds as a spice, especially in southern European cuisine.

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