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All About Rosemary | Know Your Spice Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

All About Rosemary | Know Your Spice Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

All About Rosemary | Know Your Spice Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

All About Rosemary | Know Your Spice Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

It is also known as Old Man in English

Rosemary or Rosmarinus officinalis is an evergreen shrub or a small tree from the Lamiaceae (Mint Family).

Rusmari is the native of Mediterranean region, is was one of the plants that, according to the Capitulare de villis, was grown in medieval monasteries.

It is cultivated in Europe and California in the USA.

It is also grown in Algeria, China, Middle East, Morocco, Russia, Romania, Serbia, Tunisia, Turkey, and to a limited extent in India.

Temperate climate is suitable for the cultivation of Rusmari. The soil properties influence the yield and the composition of rosemary oil.

In Latin tongue, the plant was called rosmarinus; this is interpreted as made from ros dew (akin to Sanskrit rasa [रसsap, juice) and marinus belonging to the sea (from Latin mare sea)

What are the other names of Rosemary?

Rusmari names in other languages are given below.
Indian Languages Other Languages
Hindi: Rusmari, Rosmari
Bengali: Rosemary
Gujarati:
Rōjhamērī
Malayalam
: Rēāsmēri
Marathi: Shatavari
Punjabi:
Gulāba
Sanskrit:
Rusmari
Tamil:
Rōsmēri
Telugu:
Rōjmērī
Latin (Botanical): Rosmarinus officinalis
Arabic: Ikleel al-Jabal, Iklil al-Jabal
Chinese:
Maih Diht Heung
Dutch:
Rozemarijn
French:
Romarin, Rosmarin encens
German: Rosmarin
Italian: Ramerino, Rosmarino
Spanish: Romero, Rosmario
Swedish
: Rosmarin

What exactly is Rosemary?

Get to know more about Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Spice Card – All About Rosemary | Know Your Spice Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

The Rosmarinus officinalis plant is a dense, evergreen, hardy, perennial, aromatic herb, 90 cm high with small (2-4 cm) pointed, sticky, hairy leaves.

The upper surface of the leaf is dark green whereas it is white on the lower side. The leaves are resinous.

Branches are rigid with fissured bark and stem is square, woody and brown. Pale blue small flowers appear in cymose inflorescence.

It can be grown either as a field crop or as an indoor plant.

What is the nutritional value of Rosemary?

Find out about the nutritional value of Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

One tablespoon of dried Rosmarinus officinalis provides just under 11 calories, according to USDA data.

Most of those calories come from carbohydrate in the form of fiber, but the herb is not a significant source of carbs, sugar, or fiber.

A typical one-tablespoon serving of rusmari is also not likely to provide significant micronutrients.

However, you will get a small amount of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, and folate. Minerals in rosemary include calcium, iron, and magnesium, and manganese.

What is the chemical composition of Rosemary?

Know and understand about chemical composition of Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Twenty compounds representing 99.93% of the oils were identified.

The main constituents of the oils were p-cymene (44.02%), linalool (20.5%), gamma-terpinene (16.62%), thymol (1.81%), beta-pinene (3.61%), alpha-pinene (2.83%) and eucalyptol (2.64%).

The oil consisted of monoterpenic hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons.

These constituents display antifungal & antibacterial activities of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis).

What is the history of Rosemary?

Know more about the origins & the story behind Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

The herb has been used since the time of the early Greeks and Romans. Greek scholars often wore a garland of the herb on their heads to help their memory during examinations.

In the ninth century, Charlemagne insisted that the herb be grown in his royal gardens. The Eau de Cologne that Napoleon Bonaparte used was made with Rosmarinus officinalis.

The herb was also the subject of many poems and was mentioned in five of Shakespeare’s plays.

A sprig of the herb was often placed in the hands of the deceased at a funeral because it is a symbol of remembrance.

Brides often wore rosemary at their weddings because it was also a symbol of happiness, loyalty and love.

Legend has it that rosemary originally had white flowers which were changed to blue ones when the Virgin Mary placed her cloak upon it while resting during her flight to Egypt.

Dried sprigs of rusmari even showed up in Egyptian tombs from 3,000 B.C.

Dioscorides, a contemporary of both Pliny the Elder and Galen, wrote of rosemary in his opus De Materia Medica, the gold standard about the use & identification of medicinal herbs for 1,400 years.

Rosemary was cultivated by the Spanish in the 13th century where it became a popular condiment for salted meats from the 15th to 18th centuries.

What are the uses of Rosemary?

How is Rusmari used?
  • The herb is known to naturally repel moths and give your clothes an earthy pine scent.
  • You can also place a drop or two of its essential oil on your pillows to help you unwind and fall into a relaxed sleep.
  • It is known to naturally treat poor digestion, depression, headaches and sore muscles.
  • It is widely used to season foods, particularly lamb, duck, chicken, sausages, seafood, stuffings, stews, soups, potatoes, tomatoes, turnips, other vegetables, and beverages.
  • Both fresh and dried leaves of the herb have been used for their characteristic aroma in food cooking or consumed in small amount as herbal tea (recipe is given below).
  • Its extracts are routinely employed as natural antioxidant to improve the shelf life of perishable foods.
  • The plant is also known to be employed in traditional medicines in many countries even far beyond its native Mediterranean region where it grows wild.
  • The other major use of rosemary is in the perfumery industry where the essential oils are employed as natural ingredients of fragrances.
  • Infused into olive oil and use it externally for skin irritations like eczema and other irritations listed above.
  • Rusmari-infused oil is an intensive treatment for bad dandruff of hair loss and can be rubbed on hair, left for at least an hour and washed out. This really improves scalp condition!
  • Rusmari infused vinegar is used as a tonic hair rinse after shampooing and is useful to stimulate hair regrowth. It’s high antioxidant properties inhibit greying.

What does Rosemary taste like?

What is the the taste of Rusmari?

The herb has a strong piney, resinous flavor and can easily take over a dish, so it should be used sparingly, especially with fish or vegetables.


Steak with Rosemary on the Pan


What are the ayurvedic properties of Rosemary?

Information about ayurvedic details of Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis).

Rasa (Taste): Katu (Pungent), Tikta (Bitter)
Guna (Qualities): Snigdha (Oily), Laghu (Light), Suksma (Subtle Penetrating)
Veerya (Potency): Usna (Hot)
Vipaka (Taste conversion after digestion): Katu (Pungent)
Karma (Actions): Reduces kapha and vata; its warming qualities can increase pitta.


What can I use Rosemary for?

Learn how to use Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis) in your food & beverages.

Fresh rosemary contains a higher percentage of volatile oils than dried rosemary. Add rosemary in the last 30 minutes of cooking to capture the highest amount of flavor in food.  

  • Dried or fresh herbs can be used in cooking. It is great with meat dishes (especially lamb).
  • Add black pepper and other Italian herbs for a Mediterranean flavour & make a seasoning.
  • Add the leaves to bread dough or sprinkle over pizza crust before topping with tomato sauce, meat, or cheese.
  • Dried stems can be added to olive oil or vinegar for salad dressings and sauces.
  • Make a granita using rosemary, lavender, ginger and sparkling wine for an easy after-dinner treat.
  • Make a herb pesto that is perfect on the top of meat or mashed potatoes.
  • Use fresh branches as skewers to assemble these sweet and spicy canapés on a simple rectangular serving platter.
  • Rosemary Tea can be made using rosemary leaves, which can be dried or fresh. It may improve your memory.
  • Try finely chopping fresh rosemary and tossing it with roasted potatoes, sweet potatoes, or any other root vegetable for a soul-soothing treat.
  • Infuse your coffee with a rosemary flavour.

How long does Rosemary last?

Learn about how long does Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis) last in storage.

When stored properly, the herb will last around 10 to 14 days in the refrigerator. But if have more than you can use in two weeks, try freezing or drying it.

How do I store Rosemary?

Learn about how to store Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis).

Simply wrap your rosemary sprigs in a damp paper towel and place it in a ziplock bag. Seal the bag and place it in the crisper of your refrigerator. This should keep it fresh for up to three weeks.

Is there a substitute for Rosemary?

Learn how to use a substitute for Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis) if unavailable
  • Dried rosemary is a great substitute for fresh rosemary.
  • Both oreganobasil work as a substitute.
  • Dried savory, tarragon, and thyme are all suitable alternatives to rosemary.

Where do I buy Rosemary from?

Where to Locate Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis) in the Grocery Store?

You can find dried rosemary in the spice section of a grocery store. Fresh rosemary may be sold with other herbs in the vegetables section.

If buying online, try this link.

What are the health benefits of Rosemary?

Learn about health benefits of Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

The following are health benefits of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) or Rusmari

  • Health Benefits of Rosemary as an Antioxidant – Rosemary is a rich source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, which are thought to help boost the immune system and improve blood circulation.
  • Health Benefits of Rusmari for Memory – Scientists have found that rosemary may also be good for your brain. Rosemary contains an ingredient called carnosic acid, which can fight off damage by free radicals in the brain.
  • Health Benefits of Rusmari as an Anti-inflammatory Agent – Rosemary is a rich source of anti-inflammatory compounds. They help boost the immune system and improve blood circulation.
  • Health Benefits of Rosemary as an Antimicrobial Agent – Rosemary is specifically powerful against bacterial infections. It is linked to preventing staph infections.
  • Health Benefits of Rusmari for Memory Function – Rosemary is considered a cognitive stimulant and can help improve memory performance and quality. It is also known to boost alertness, intelligence, and focus.
  • Health Benefits of Rosemary for Mood – The aroma of rosemary has been linked to improving mood, clearing the mind, and relieving stress in those with chronic anxiety or stress hormone imbalances.
  • Health Benefits of Rusmari for Hair Care: The oil of rosemary has been known to promote hair growth prevent baldness, slow graying, and treat dandruff and dry scalp.
  • Health Benefits of Rosemary for Digestion: Rosemary is often used for digestion problems, including heartburn, intestinal gas, liver and gallbladder complaints, and loss of appetite.
  • Health Benefits of Rusmari against Cancer: A Research published in Oncology Reports, found that “crude ethanolic rosemary extract (RO)” slowed the spread of human leukemia and breast carcinoma cells.”
  • Health Benefits of Rosemary for Eyes: Carnosic acid, which is a major component of rosemary, can significantly promote eye health.
  • Health Benefits of Rusmari against Diabetes: Studies have shown that compounds in rosemary tea may lower blood sugar, suggesting that rosemary could have potential applications for managing high blood sugar among people with diabetes.

All About Rosemary | Know Your Spice Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)
Print

Rosemary - How to Make Rosemary Tea? Rusmari Chai

Rosemary - How to Make Rosemary Tea? Rusmari Chai - Enjoy this rosemary tea recipe for its flavour, aroma, and health benefits.
Course Beverage, Tea
Cuisine World
Diet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Vegan, Vegetarian
Keyword Make Rosemary Tea, Rosemary, Rosemary Tea, Rosemary Tea Recipe, Rusmari, Rusmari Chai
Prep Time 7 minutes
Total Time 7 minutes
Servings 1 Serving
Calories 5kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon Rosemary leaves
  • 1 Cup Water Boiling

Instructions

  • Bring water to a boil.
  • Add 1 teaspoon of loose rosemary leaves to the boiled water.
  • Steep for 5–10 minutes.
  • Strain the rosemary leaves from the hot water using a mesh strainer.
  • Pour your rosemary tea into a mug and enjoy.

Notes

  • You can add a sweetener, such as sugar or honey to your rosemary tea, if you prefer.

Tools & Equipment Used For This Recipe

The links below the image lead to product links on Amazon.in & Amazon.com respectively

Saucepan

Strainer

FInally! To Sum It Up

All About Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) | Uses & Health Benefits of Rosemary

Spice Card – All About Rosemary | Know Your Spice Rusmari (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Rosemary or Rosmarinus officinalis is an evergreen shrub or a small tree from the Lamiaceae (Mint Family).

The herb is the native of Mediterranean region, is was one of the plants that, according to the Capitulare de villis, was grown in medieval monasteries.

It is cultivated in Europe and California in the USA.

It is also grown in Algeria, China, Middle East, Morocco, Russia, Romania, Serbia, Tunisia, Turkey, and to a limited extent in India.

Temperate climate is suitable for the cultivation of Rusmari. The soil properties influence the yield and the composition of rosemary oil.

In Latin tongue, the plant was called rosmarinus; this is interpreted as made from ros dew (akin to Sanskrit rasa [रसsap, juice) and marinus belonging to the sea (from Latin mare sea)

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